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An Interview With Stages Power for Campagnolo’s Creator

July 10, 2017

Campagnolo has one of the richest histories in cycling and continues to generate great, lust worthy product. For Sam Morrison, creator of the Stages Power meter for Campagnolo  there’s a bit of nostalgia when it comes to Campy. Morrison started out riding on his Dad’s bike equipped with 1995 Campagnolo Record. Years later, the first bike he ever bought was stocked with Chorus 10 speed — the bike is long gone, but the group set is still safely tucked away in his garage.

Now, over a decade later, Morrison is the man responsible for bringing the Stages Power meter for Campagnolo to life.

MORRISON:  There is something really beautiful about the Campagnolo groupset — and there aren’t a lot of power meters for it.  As we started tackling carbon meters, we knew the most important thing about making a meter for Campy would be protecting it’s look. It seemed like a perfect fit – because of our design we knew we could make a power meter that would blend in very well to the crank arm design without interrupting the overall aesthetics.

 

Campagnolo Record

MOORISON: The Campagnolo meters are easy to use, simple, and as reliable as all of our other meters. Maintaining proper temperature compensation and accurate torque measurements are the fundamentals to doing so successfully.

EXPLORE RECORD

Campagnolo
Record

 

THE STRAIN GAGES:

MORRISON: The shape of the Campagnolo crank arms present some unique challenges. Our standard technique and placement of our strain gages didn’t satisfy us 100%. They worked, but it simply wasn’t good though for us.

We went back to the drawing board and decided to go the route of a completely new gage and location. From there the design went pretty quickly. We have an arsenal of tests that we do to find out if everything is being accounted for and once that is complete we actually go and ride the meter.

I spent 9 months riding and racing the final design before we ever shipped anything out the door. Everything can look great on paper, but nothing beats a few months of thrashing it to validate the design.